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    Grade 10 Social Studies


    Advanced Placement European History (27 weeks,1.5 credits)

    This course investigates the development of Western European society between 1450 and the present. The students will become familiar with the principal themes in modern European history and the methods for the analysis of historical evidence.Advanced Placement European History is designed for students who seek college level work.  
    Students who take this course should plan to take the Advanced Placement European History Test given in May.


    Modern World History, Honors or Academic (18 weeks,1 credit)

    This course will concentrate on the history of the modern world, both Western and non-Western, from 1450 CE to the present. Topics will include foreign policy,political systems, social and cultural change, and economic trends. This course is designed for students seeking academically challenging material.

     

    The honors course addresses the same time period and topics as the academic course but inmore depth, with added readings, writing assignments, and projects.

     

     

     

    Grade 11 Social Studies: 

     

    Advanced Placement U.S. History (27 weeks,1.5 credits)

     

    This course examines the history of the United States in a chronological manner from the Colonial Period through the 1990s. Students complete readings in both factual and interpretive textbooks. Class participants will address more historical material, study history in greater depth, and complete projects and writing assignments other than those assigned in Recent America, Honors or Academic.The course is designed for students who seek college-level work. Students who take this course should plan to take the Advanced Placement U.S. History Test given in May.
     


    American Government and Economic Systems (AGES) Academic and Honors (18 weeks, 1 credit)

     

    American Government and Economic Systems (AGES) has taken two separate 9 week courses(American Political Systems) and (Economics) and combined them into one 18 week course. The major goal for the course is to have our students become informed,effective decision makers as well as active participants in America's political and economic system.

    The American Government aspects of the course will examine the organization and operation of the political system in the United States. More specifically, it will focus on the three branches of our national government, the role of political parties, interest groups, and elections. 

     

    The economic aspects of the course will introduce such fundamental economic concepts as scarcity, opportunity costs, supply and demand, competition and incentives, fiscal monetary policy, forms of business organization, the business cycle, and the economic role of government. The central skill of economics is decision-making; emphasis will be placed on the development of an economic perspective to problem-solving so that students can better understand current economic issues such as inflation, unemployment, productivity, and the national debt.

     

    The course is designed for students seeking academically challenging material.The honors level will address the same topics but in more depth with added readings,assignments, projects, and a more rigorous final exam.

     

     

     

    Grade 12 Social Studies

     

    Advanced Placement Macroeconomics (18 weeks,1 credit)

     

    This course will examine the behaviors of the entire economy, including the study of employment,inflation, economic growth, and consumer spending. This course is designed for students who seek college-level work. Prerequisites: B or better in AP European History or A- or better in World History or teacher recommendation.

     

    Students who take this course should plan to take the AP Macroeconomics test in May.

     

    Advanced Placement Comparative Government (18 weeks,1 credit)

     

    This course will focus on the historical and contemporary development of governmental,political, and social systems in Great Britain, France, Russia, China, and other less developed nations. This course is designed for students who seek college-level work. Prerequisites: B or better in AP European History or A- or better in World History or teacher recommendation.

     

    Students who take this course should plan to take the AP Comparative Government test in May.

     

    Global Relations Academic and Honors (18 weeks,1 credit)
     
    Students in this course will study how countries relate to one another,how they work together, and how they sometimes conflict in our world today.  A major focus of the course is the impact of international issues on the formulation of American foreign policy.  Comparative economic systems and international trade in the evolving global economy will also be considered.  The central skill of economics is decision-making; emphasis will be placed on the development of an economic perspective to problem-solving so students can better understand current economic issues such as inflation,unemployment, stagflation, productivity, and the national debt. 

     


    Electives:

     

    Introduction to the Law – Grades10, 11, 12 (9 weeks, .5 credit)

    What are my legal rights and responsibilities as a citizen in the United States as a juvenile or as an adult in society? What legal structures and procedures govern and protect me? Introduction to the Law is designed to help students answer these questions by conducting a thorough examination of the political and lega lideals and practices of this country.
     


    Psychology – Grades11, 12 (9 weeks, .5 credit)

    This course introduces students to the factors affecting human behavior and the ideas of the more prominent psychologists. Stages of human development, learning,perception, personality, and the psychological basis of behavior are among the topics investigated. Through readings, discussion, viewing, and experimentation, students achieve a better understanding of human behavior.
     


    Sociology – Grades11, 12 (9 weeks, .5 credit)

     

    Sociology will enable students to better understand the relationships and influences of social groups upon the individual. The socialization process, social stratification, deviance, social institutions, and cultural change are among the topics explored. A variety of sociological perspectives will be applied throughout this course in order to enable students to analyze social behavior.