• You might enjoy indulging in some grammar practice.  Here are three good (I think) sites for your perusal.  Be sure to let me know if you find better resources out there.
     
     
     
     
    It is hard to write well.  It is also noble.  
     
    George Orwell had some very good things to say about good writing in his famous essay, "Politics and the English Language." 
     
    Orwell  
    Orwell advocated "prose like a windowpane"-- prose (all writing aside from poetry) so clear that it draws no attention to itself and instead reveals with dazzling clarity the idea you mean to convey.
     
    E.B. White also had a number of wonderful things to say about clarity and precision in his famous book:
     
    Elements of style  
     
    You could even buy it here. 
     
    Listen in to what White has to say:
     

    If you doubt that style is something of a mystery, try rewriting a familiar sentence and see what happens. Any much-quoted sentence will do. Suppose we take “These are the times that try men’s souls.” Here we have eight short, easy words, forming a simple declarative sentence. The sentence contains no flashy ingredient such as “Damn the torpedoes!” and the words, as you see, are ordinary. Yet in that arrangement, they have shown great durability; the sentence is into its third century. Now compare a few variations:

    Times like these try men’s souls.

    How trying it is to live in these times!

    These are trying times for men’s souls.

    Soulwise, these are trying times.

    It seems unlikely that Thomas Paine could have made his sentiment stick if he had couched it in any of these forms. But why not? No fault of grammar can be detected in them, and in every case the meaning is clear. Each version is correct, and each, for some reason that we can’t readily put our finger on, is marked for oblivion. We could, of course, talk about “rhythm” and “cadence,” but the talk would be vague and unconvincing. We could declare soulwise to be a silly word, inappropriate to the occasion; but even that won’t do — it does not answer the main question. Are we even sure soulwise is silly? Ifotherwise is a serviceable word, what’s the matter with soulwise?

    Learning to write clear sentences is the work of a lifetime.  No time to waste!  Get cracking!
     
    Wilbur  
     
    And try this article by Verlyn Klinkenborg, who writes beautifully, on the merits of an education in the humanities.