• Writing - Day 2: March 18, 2020
    (There are two activities for writing today, please scroll down to see both activities)

     Grammar Practice:

    Overview: Identify and understand compound sentences and conjunctions

    Estimated Time: 5 minutes

    Explanation: Today you will be defining compound sentences and conjunctions. You will practice identifying compound sentences, simple sentences, and conjunctions. 

    Things to Know:

    A simple sentence is an independent clause or statement which includes one subject (for example: girl) and one verb (for example: ran). A simple sentence may include one predicate (for example: ran up the steps).  The predicate is a verb phrase that has more than one word. 

    Example:

    The girl ran.

    The girl ran to the bus stop.

    A compound sentence includes at least two independent clauses joined together by a conjunction.  Conjunctions are words such as andbutornorso, and yet.

                  Example:

                                 The girl ran to the bus stop, but she missed the bus.   

    Tasks for Today:
    *All activities can be completed in your composition book or electronically (Word, Seesaw, PowerPoint, etc.)
    **Files needed for today's activities can also be found in our Homeroom Team

    1. Complete section two (T) of the Compound Sentences grammar review
      • For each compound sentence example, underline the two simple sentences/independent clauses and circle each conjunction.

     

    Share today's work:

    Remember, your work today is not graded, but I'd love to see what you've done. You can share your work with me through Teams, email (jsnyder@cbsd.org), Seesaw, or share your composition book with me when we return to school.  

     


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    Informative Essay PRACTICE:

    Overview: Exploring the characteristics of informative writing

    Estimated Time: 40 minutes 

    Explanation: Today you will be using what you have learned about informative writing to draft an essay on a topic of your choice.   

    Things to Know:  

    Informative writing focuses on a single topic or idea.  The purpose is to inform or teach readers about a topic.  Informative writing includes more specific subtopics which are directly related to the overall topic.  Each subtopic is typically addressed in its own paragraph.  In the introductory paragraph, start with a lead or strong opening to hook the attention of your reader.  The body paragraphs should use facts and details to support the ideas presented about each subtopic.  Transition words and phrases help to keep the essay organized and connect ideas together.  Some informative writing includes text features such as headings, diagrams, pictures, tables, and timelines.  A strong ending ties back to your lead, provides a brief summary of your essay, and draws a conclusion about the information learned about the topic.   

     

    Tasks for Today –
    *All activities can be completed in your composition book or electronically (Word, Seesaw, PowerPoint, etc.)
    **Files needed for today's activities can also be found in our Homeroom Team

    1. Use the information that you gathered about your topic yesterday to help you organize your body paragraphs.  
    2. Create your own graphic organizer (an outline, a web, a table or chart, etc.) to help you organize the information you will include in your body paragraphs.  Remember that your body paragraphs should contain supporting details and “tell more” statements to elaborate upon those details. 
      • Complete your graphic organizer in your composition book or writer’s notebook.  Bring your notebook back to school.  If you have access to technology and would like to create an electronic/digital organizer, use your OneDrive, and save the document in your 6th Grade folder. 

     

    Share today's work:

    Remember, your work today is not graded, but I'd love to see what you've done. You can share your work with me through Teams, email (jsnyder@cbsd.org), Seesaw, or share your composition book with me when we return to school.